The Path of Needles.

Second instalment of the Bitten triptych; a work that uses the ‘Little Red Riding Hood’ fable as a rough framework to explore werewolfism as a metaphor for female puberty. Like the lupine transformation, adolescence leads to the development of androgenic hair and visible bodily change. Fertility is heralded by the menstrual cycle; whose pattern is traditionally linked with the phases of the moon. Of course, the latter is also associated with so-called ‘madness’ (anger and antisocial moods). The works investigate the development and maturation of young girls and raise questions of choice and consent, moratorium and foreclosure; but delve into the mind of the wolf as well as the ‘curse’ takes hold.

This book deals with the sexual aspects of growing up. The book opens from the middle and has a ‘girl side’ and a ‘wolf’ side.’ It is meant to look like the pages from the two sides have been removed and stitched together to create a new narrative. Needles were once seen as a sexual symbol (because they have an eye that can be threaded); and the book tries to reference some possible pathways that the girl could have taken with her sexuality — that is, being passive or proactive.

Part 1.

Part 3.

Birthday present for a Flash fan. He liked it.

Photos by Munkspi.

Source photo by Simon Subrosa.

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